MMP - Metadata Guidelines

MMP - Metadata Guidelines

Title

Element Name

Title
Dublin Core Definition
A name given to the resource.
Is Field Required?
Required
Is Field Repeatable?
No
How to Use?
Title may also be an identifying phrase or name of the object supplied by the contributing institution. Take the title from digitized item when possible. Metadata creator may supply a title if none exists and does not need to put this supplied title in brackets.
Examples
Progressive Men of Montana
The Sun Also Rises
Main Street, Three Forks, Montana Looking West
Unknown man on horseback with dog (worst case)
Refines/Refinement
Refinement: alternative
Schemes
None
Dublin Core Mapping
dcterms: title
MARC Mapping
245 subfields a and b
Past Perfect Photos
Title
Past Perfect Archives
Title
Past Perfect Objects
Object Name

Description

Element Name

Description
Dublin Core DefinitionAn account of the resource.
Is Field Required?
Required
Is Field Repeatable?
Yes
How to Use?Anything significant about the digital resource not covered elsewhere. Use standard punctuation and grammar to describe the item's history, physical appearance, contents, abstract, etc. Repeat the title if nothing else fits. For text or handwritten objects that have full-text searchable transcriptions as associated with them, provide the full-text in a local field called Transcription. (See transcription).
Examples
Illustrated guide to airport markings and lighting signals, with particular reference to SMGCS (Surface Movement Guidance and Control System) for airports with low visibility conditions.

Portrait of infant girl, wearing dress, hands in lap, seated in chair. Probably Mary Bell, half-sister of William S. Bell.
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesNone
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: description
MARC Mapping520, 545, 500
Past Perfect PhotosDescription
Past Perfect ArchivesScope and Content/Abstract
Past Perfect Objects
Description

Type

Element Name

Type
Dublin Core DefinitionThe nature or genre fo the resource.
Is Field Required?Required
Is Field Repeatable? No
How to Use?
Must have at least one type field containing appropriate type(s) from DCMI Type vocabulary.

For images use the DCMI type Image.

If a resource is an image of text (such as a scan of a printed article), use the term Text.

If the resource consists of more than one type (e.g., an interview with sound and text files), use the term that best defines the collection as a whole.

For more information about DCMI Type vocabulary see: http://dublincore.org/documents/2000/07/11/dcmi-type-vocabulary/

To describe the nature or genre of the original object, use the required local element genre.
Examples
Image
Sound
Text
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesDCMI Type Vocabulary
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: type
MARC Mapping655 #7 subfield a (Index Term‐‐Genre/Form) plus subfield 2=local (for DCMI Type)
Past Perfect PhotosCustom Field
Past Perfect ArchivesCustom Field
Past Perfect ObjectsCustom Field

Creator

Element Name

Creator
Dublin Core DefinitionAn entity primarily responsible for making the resource.
Is Field Required?
Required, if applicable
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?
Person or entity responsible for creating the intellectual content of the resource. Prefer form of name as verified in the Library of Congress Name Authority File (LCNAF) http://authorities.loc.gov/. If name is not listed there, give name in the following format: Last name, First name, Middle name or Middle initial (if available), year of birth and/or death if known, separated by a hyphen. Nicknames or popular culture names are not inverted, if you have questions check LCNAF.

Separate multiple entries within this field by inserting a semicolon and a space.

For further help in formatting names not found in LCNAF, consult a cataloging resource such as the Anglo‐American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), Resource Description and Access (RDA), or Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).
Examples
Examples of creators include authors of written documents, artists, photographers, collectors of natural specimens or artifacts, organizations that generate archival collections, etc.

Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616
Bridger Canyon Planning and Zoning Commission
Russell, Charles M. (Charles Marion), 1864-1926
Hileman, T.J. (Tomar Jacob)
Sundance Kid
Cast, P. C. (Phyllis Christine), 1960-; Cast, Kristin, 1986-
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesLibrary of Congress Name Authority File (LCNAF)
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: creator
MARC Mapping
100 1# (Main Entry‐‐Personal Name), or 110 2# (Main Entry‐‐Corporate Name), 111 1# (Main Entry‐‐Conference Name) or 700/710/711
Past Perfect PhotosPhotographer
Past Perfect ArchivesCreator, Primary Artist - if applicable
Past Perfect ObjectsArtist, if applicable

Genre 

Element Name

Genre
Dublin Core DefinitionDescribes the type of item
Is Field Required?
Required - if do not use Genre (AAT)
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Describe the nature of the original object (what it is, not what it is about) expressed in genre terms from a controlled vocabulary. An item described with the genre term “photographs” is an actual photograph, not a book about photographs.
Examples
art                                 newspapers
books                            pamphlets
brochures                     photographs
diaries                           postcards
documents                   sound recordings
letters                           yearbooks
maps                             periodicals
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesMMP Short List
Dublin Core MappingNone
MARC Mapping655 #7 subfield a (Index Term‐‐Genre/Form) plus subfield 2=aat (for Art & Architecture Thesaurus)
Past Perfect PhotosObject Name
Past Perfect ArchivesObject Name
Past Perfect ObjectsObject Name


Language

Element Name

Language
Dublin Core DefinitionA language of the resource
Is Field Required?
Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Use ISO 639‐3 three letter codes. For multiple languages, use separate language fields or list all in a single field, separating each with a semicolon and a space. More detail about the languages may be included in the Description element. Example: In German and English in parallel columns.
Examples
English = eng
Hutterite German = geh
Crow = cro
English and Crow = eng; cro
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesISO 639-3
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: language
MARC Mapping041 0# subfield a (language code); 008/35‐37
Past Perfect PhotosN/A
Past Perfect ArchivesLanguage, if applicable
Past Perfect ObjectsN/A

Date

Element Name

Date
Dublin Core DefinitionDate of creation of the original object. 
Is Field Required?
Required* - Guess a year or year-to-year
Is Field Repeatable?No
How to Use? 
A resource may have several dates associated with it. The date covered by this table refers to creation of the original resource, that is, when the resource was first created, before undergoing any conversion.

The date must be entered in this format for the item to be searchable by date YYYY or YYYY-MM or YYYY-MM-DD or YYYY-YYYY

Do not include any letters or characters other than the hyphen in this field.

For resources created in a non‐digital format and converted to digital format, use the date the non‐digital resource was first created ‐‐ e.g., for print books, use the publication date of the print book.

For resources that have always been in digital format and never converted, use the date the digital resource was created ‐‐ e.g., PDF document uploaded as a PDF document.

For resources that were first created in one digital format, then converted to another digital format ‐‐ e.g., audio file recorded in WAV format, then converted to MP3 format ‐‐ use creation date of the first digital format ‐‐ e.g., WAV. 

The date field is set up in three parts separated by semi-colons without spaces. Part 1 is the date as it will be shown on the website. Part 2 is the beginning date for search. Part three is the end date for searching.
Examples
1918;1918-01-01;1918-12-31
1908-02;1908-02-01;1908-02-28
1896-07-04;1896-07-04;1896-07-04
1901-2000;1901-01-01;1901-12-31
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesW3C Date Time Format profile of ISO 8601 (W3CDTP)
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: date
MARC Mapping260 subfield c (Date of publication, distribution, etc.), 264 subfield c
Past Perfect PhotosDate
Past Perfect ArchivesDate
Past Perfect ObjectsDate

Subject      

One of the followling Subject thesaurii can be used to complete the field. We highly recommend the Library of Congress (LCSH) format for this field.

Subject (TGM)

Element Name

Subject (TGM)
Dublin Core DefinitionThe topic of the resource. 
Is Field Required?
Required* Unless using Subject (AAT) or (LCSH)
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Describe what the resource content is about, expressed in Thesaurus for Graphic Materials (TGM).  Look up keywords or phrases on this website: http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/graphicMaterials.html
Examples
Nineteen seventies
Newspapers
Miners
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesThesaurus for Graphic Materials: TGM
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: subject
MARC Mapping650, 600, 651, 610, 653 
Past Perfect PhotosPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms
Past Perfect ArchivesPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms
Past Perfect ObjectsPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms

Subject (AAT)

Element Name

Subject (AAT)
Dublin Core DefinitionThe topic of the resource. 
Is Field Required?
Required* Unless using Subject (TGM) or (LCSH)
Is Field Repeatable?
How to Use?Describe what the resource content is about, expressed in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) Subject terms.  website: http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/aat/index.html
Examples
mines
newspapers
newspaper indexes
Refines/Refinement
None
SchemesArt & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT)
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: subject
MARC Mapping650, 600, 651, 610, 653
Past Perfect PhotosPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms
Past Perfect ArchivesPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms
Past Perfect ObjectsPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms

Subject (LCSH)
Library of Congress Subject Headings http://id.loc.gov/

Element Name

Subject (LCSH)
Dublin Core DefinitionThe topic of the resource. 
Is Field Required?
Required* Unless using Subject (TGM) or (AAT)
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Describe what the resource content is about, expressed in the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) terms. Look up keywords or phrases at this website: http://id.loc.gov/
Examples
Montana, Eastern
Conrad (Mont.)
Star Mine (Cascade County, Mont.)
Mines (Military explosives)--Detection
Energy crops
Crops and soils
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesLibrary of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH)
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: subject
MARC Mapping650, 600, 651, 610, 653
Past Perfect PhotosPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms
Past Perfect ArchivesPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms
Past Perfect ObjectsPeople, Subjects, Classification, Search Terms

Contributor

Element Name

Contributor
Dublin Core DefinitionAn entity responsible for making contributions to the resource. 
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use? 
Use for other people or entities who contributed to making the intellectual content of the resource, but who are not covered in the creator field. Examples include illustrators, editors, translators, etc. When possible, refine the contributor name by including the role the person or entity played in contributing to the resource. Prefer form of name as verified in the Library of Congress Name Authority File (LCNAF). If name is not listed there, give name in the following format: Last name, First name, Middle name or Middle initial (if available) year of birth and/or death if known, separated by a hyphen. Add a comma and space, then the role of the person or entity in this work.

Separate multiple entries within this field by inserting a semicolon and a space.

For further help in formatting names not found in LCNAF, consult a cataloging resource such as the Anglo‐American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), Resource Description and Access (RDA), or Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).

When adding a role, use a role term from MARC Relator Codes list and use the spelled‐out role rather than the code. Example: author of screenplay not the code aus.
Examples
Dickens, Charles, 1812‐1870, author;
Davies, Andrew W., 1936‐, author of screenplay;
Cameron, Julia Margaret, 1815‐1879, photographer
Refines/Refinement
None
SchemesLibrary of Congress Name Authority File (LCNAF)
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: contributor
MARC Mapping 
700, 710, 711, 720 (Added Entry – Personal name, Corporate name, Conference name, Uncontrolled Name). The role is from subfield e. 
Past Perfect PhotosN/A
Past Perfect ArchivesOther Creators
Past Perfect ObjectsN/A

Contributing Institution

Element Name

Contributing Institution 
Dublin Core DefinitionAn entity responsible for making the resource available
Is Field Required?Required
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use
Name of the entity that created or is providing access to the resource. If the resource existed in another form prior to being digitized, provide information about that previous publisher in the publisher field and give the creation date for the original in the date field. A publisher may include a person, organization, or a service.

Separate multiple entries within this field by inserting a semicolon and a space between each two entries.

Prefer LCNAF if applicable. If not available use the same form of your institution’s name consistently.
Examples
University of Montana--Missoula. Mansfield Library
Museum of the Rockies
Billings Public Library
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesLCNAF if applicable 
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: publisher
MARC Mapping260 subfield b (if born digital) or 264 subfield b (if born digital) or 533 subfield c (if reformatted)
Past Perfect PhotosName of Museum or Archive
Past Perfect ArchivesName of Museum or Archive
Past Perfect ObjectsName of Museum or Archive

Publisher (Original)

Element Name

Publisher (original) 
Dublin Core DefinitionAn entity responsible for making the original resource available.
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Name of the entity that published the resource. Prefer LCNAF
ExamplesHenington Industries
Daniels County Commission
The Shelby promoter (Shelby, Mont.)
Standard Manufacturing & Print. Co. (Butte, Mont.)
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesPrefer LCNAF
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: Source
MARC Mapping260 subfield b (if born digital) or 533 subfield c (if reformatted)
Past Perfect PhotosN/A
Past Perfect ArchivesPublisher, if applicable
Past Perfect ObjectsN/A

Geographic Coverage

Element Name

Geographic Coverage
Dublin Core DefinitionThe place or geographic region this resource covers or is about.
Is Field Required?Required, if known 
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Use to state the place or area that is described or represented by the resource, not the place where the resource was published. May name a place or specify geographic coordinates. A jurisdiction may be a named administrative entity or a geographic place to which the resource applies.
Examples
United States
Montana
Yellowstone County, Montana
Billings, Montana
Refines/RefinementRefines Coverage 
Schemes
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: coverage-spatial 
MARC Mapping651 #0 (for LCSH place names) or #7 with the specific vocabulary source provided in subfield 2 (TGN, for example)
Past Perfect PhotosPlace
Past Perfect ArchivesGPS?
Past Perfect ObjectsSite/Site # if applicable

Time Period Represented

Element Name

Time Period Represented
Dublin Core DefinitionThe time period this resource covers.
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Use to describe the time period covered or represented by the resource, not the date when the resource was published. Temporal topic may be a named period, date, or date range. If using a named period, use a controlled vocabulary if possible such as Library of Congress Subjects (LCSH). Where appropriate, time periods can be used in preference to numeric identifiers such as date ranges
Examples
Twentieth Century
1920-1925
Prohibition
Dustbowl Era, 1931-1939
New Deal, 1933-1939
Refines/RefinementRefines Coverage 
SchemesLibrary of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects.html
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: coverage-temporal 
MARC Mappingnone
Past Perfect PhotosYear Range
Past Perfect ArchivesYear Range
Past Perfect ObjectsYear Range

Digital Collection

Element Name

Digital Collection
Dublin Core DefinitionThe name of the digital collection.
Is Field Required?Required
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?State the name of the digital collection to which this resource belongs.
Examples
Jack L. Demmons' Bonner School Photographs
Natives of Montana Archives Project
Photographs from the Montana Historical Society
Refines/RefinementRefines relation
Schemesnone
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: relation-isPartOf
MARC Mappingnone
Past Perfect PhotosCustom Field
Past Perfect ArchivesCustom Field
Past Perfect ObjectsCustom Field

Physical Collection

Element Name

Physical Collection
Dublin Core DefinitionA related resource in which the described resource is physically included.
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?Used to state the physical collection to which this resource belongs. This may include the call number or local identifier, so the physical items can be located if requested.
Examples
Digital Collection=Military Enlistments (Montana), 1890-1918
Physical Collection=Montana Adjutant General’s Office Records, 1889-1959 (RS 223)

Digital Collection=[President Taft visits Montana] – one photo
Physical Collection=N.A. Forsyth Stereograph Collection (ST 001)

Digital Collection=Letter inquiring if Jas D. Moore is alive
Physical Collection=North Butte Mining Company Records, 1905-1934 (MC 290 Box 6 Folder 28)
Refines/RefinementRefines relation
Schemesnone
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: relation-isPartOf
MARC Mappingnone
Past Perfect PhotosHome Location –Room, shelf, container, drawer
Past Perfect ArchivesHome Location –Room, shelf, container, drawer
Past Perfect ObjectsHome Location –Room, shelf, container, drawer

Digital Format

Element Name

Digital Format
Dublin Core DefinitionThe file format of the resource.
Is Field Required?Required
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use? 
Describe the file format of the resource using the Internet Media Type (IMT) scheme. Use of the scheme will imply the software needed to display or operate the resource.

New media types and applications are always emerging. If the resource format being described is not yet part of the MIME type list, follow the MIME convention by selecting a broad category of object format (audio, video, application, etc.) for the first part of the MIME type. For the second half of the MIME type, use the file extension that is usually attached to files of this format.

Examples
audio/mp4
image/tiff
application/pdf

Some digital objects may involve more than one format. For example, an oral history interview may consist of both an audio file (audio/mp4) and text transcription (application/pdf). In these cases, list both formats:

audio/mp4; application/pdf
Refines/RefinementRefinement: Extent and medium (physical dimensions)
Schemesnternet Media Type (IMT)
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: Format
MARC Mapping340; 856 subfield q
Past Perfect PhotosImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Format
Past Perfect ArchivesImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Format
Past Perfect ObjectsImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Format

Format-Extent

Element Name

Format - Extent
Dublin Core DefinitionThe size or duration of the digital resource.
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?
Describe the file size and, if applicable, duration of the digital object.

To describe extent (e.g., number of pages) of original object before it was digitized, use the Physical Dimension field.

For help in converting file sizes, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_size
Examples
109,568 bytes;

00:16 minutes;
Refines/RefinementRefines Format
SchemesNone
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: format-extent
MARC Mapping300
Past Perfect PhotosImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Actual Image File Size
Past Perfect ArchivesImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Actual Image File Size
Past Perfect ObjectsImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Actual Image File Size

Physical Dimensions

Element Name

Physical Dimensions
Dublin Core DefinitionDescription of the physical item.
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?
Describe the size and dimensions of the original resource.

When the resource is a text document include the number of pages in the original document.
Examples
16 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
1 card, 27.5 x 17 cm.
28 items
1 book; 598 pp.
Refines/RefinementRefines Format
Schemesnone
Dublin Core Mappingdcterms: format-medium
MARC Mapping300
Past Perfect Photos
Print Size
Past Perfect ArchivesExtent and Medium of the Unit Description
Past Perfect ObjectsDimensions

Digitization Specifications

Element Name

Digitization Specifications
Dublin Core DefinitionDescribes the process, equipment and specifications used to convert the resource into its present format.
Is Field Required?Required
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?
This field is needed if resource originally existed in a different format and has been converted. Enter Born digital, if the item was created as a digital object. Include specific information listed below to describe how the items was created. 

Use the Digitization Specifications element to record technical information about the digitization of the resource: the hardware, software, and processes used to create the digitized resource. Include such information as scanner model, scan resolution, color profiles, compression schemes, size of master file (sometimes referred to as archival file), etc. This element is primarily intended for use at the local level.
Examples
Digitization Specifications=A photographic print was scanned on an Epson Perfection 4990 Flatbed Scanner as a 3000 pixel TIFF image in 8-bit grayscale, resized to 640 pixels in the longest dimension and compressed into JPEG format using Photoshop 6.0.

Digitization Specifications=24 bits bit depth of master file format

Digitization Specifications=Epson 1640XL Scanner hardware

Digitization Specifications=PhotoshopCS Creation software

Scanned on a Bookeye 3 A1 at 400 PPI, 24-bit color. Tiff master images cropped and straightened in Photoshop CS4.  5.4. Optical Character Recognition performed using Abbyy FineReader 8 Corporate Edition.
Refines/Refinementnone
Schemesnone
Dublin Core Mappingnone
MARC Mapping538
Past Perfect PhotosImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Equipment used to Acquire, Software used to Acquire, Settings and Resolution, Grayscale or RGB (color)
Past Perfect ArchivesImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Equipment used to Acquire, Software used to Acquire, Settings and Resolution, Grayscale or RGB (color)
Past Perfect ObjectsImage Metadata – find by clicking on Image Management, then click on Metadata, Equipment used to Acquire, Software used to Acquire, Settings and Resolution, Grayscale or RGB (color)

Date Digitized

Element Name

Date Digitized
Dublin Core DefinitionDate the resource was scanned or turned into a digital object.
Is Field Required?Optional
Is Field Repeatable?No
How to Use?
List the date the item was converted to a digital file.

The date must be entered in this format for the item to be searchable by date YYYY or YYYY-MM or YYYY-MM-DD or YYYY-YYYY
Examples
2010
2009-04
2013-08-25
Refines/RefinementNone
SchemesW3C Date Time Format profile of ISO 8601 (W3CDTP)
Dublin Core Mappingnone
MARC Mappingnone
Past Perfect Photos
Catalog Date or Image Metadata
Past Perfect ArchivesCatalog Date or Image Metadata
Past Perfect ObjectsCatalog Date or Image Metadata

Collection

Repeat the title of Digital Collection so that the collection items are linked together
Element Name

Rights Management
Dublin Core DefinitionInformation about rights held in and over the resource.
Is Field Required?
Required
Is Field Repeatable?Yes
How to Use?The MMP requires the use of rights statements provided at RightsStatements.org. Type the name of the statement and copy the appropriate URI and paste it in the Rights Management Field. When applicable, a content creator may apply a creative commons license from creativecommons.org. Use the choose a copyright template to apply the correct license. https://creativecommons.org/choose/
Examples
Rights Statements
RightsStatements.org provides a set of standardized rights statements that can be used to communicate the copyright and re-use status of digital objects to the public. Our rights statements are supported by major aggregation platforms such as the Digital Public Library of America and Europeana. The rights statements have been designed with both human users and machine users (such as search engines) in mind and make use of semantic web technology. Learn more about how you can use our rights statements here.

Use the URI in the Rights Management field

In Copyright
Rights statements for in copyright objects The following five rights statements are intended for use with digital objects that are in copyright.

IN COPYRIGHT
This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make the Work available, or makes the Work available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Work available.

IN COPYRIGHT - EU ORPHAN WORK
This Rights Statement is intended for use with Items for which the underlying Work has been identified as an Orphan Work in accordance with Directive 2012/28/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on certain permitted uses of Orphan Works. It can only be applied to Items derived from Works that are covered by the Directive: Works published in the form of books, journals, newspapers, magazines or other writings as well as cinematographic or audiovisual works and phonograms (note: this excludes photography and visual arts). It can only be applied by organizations that are beneficiaries of the Directive: publicly accessible libraries, educational establishments and museums, archives, film or audio heritage institutions and public-service broadcasting organizations, established in one of the EU member states. The beneficiary is also expected to have registered the work in the EU Orphan Works Database maintained by EUIPO.

 
IN COPYRIGHT - EDUCATIONAL USE PERMITTED
This Rights Statement can be used only for copyrighted Items for which the organization making the Item available is the rights-holder or has been explicitly authorized by the rights-holder(s) to allow third parties to use the Work for educational purposes without first obtaining permission.


IN COPYRIGHT - NON-COMMERCIAL USE PERMITTED
This Rights Statement can be used only for copyrighted Items for which the organization making the Item available is the rights-holder or has been explicitly authorized by the rights-holder(s) to allow third parties to use their Work(s) for non-commercial purposes without obtaining permission first.

IN COPYRIGHT - RIGHTS-HOLDER(S) UNLOCATABLE OR UNIDENTIFIABLE
This Rights Statement is intended for use with an Item that has been identified as in copyright but for which no rights-holder(s) has been identified or located after some reasonable investigation. This Rights Statement should only be used if the organization that intends to make the Item available is reasonably sure that the underlying Work is in copyright. This Rights Statement is not intended for use by EU-based organizations who have identified works as Orphan Works in accordance with the EU Orphan Works Directive (they must use InC-OW-EU instead).

Not in Copyright
Rights statements for objects that are not in copyright
The following 4 rights statements are intended for works that are not in copyright but where there are restrictions other than copyright that prevent free re-use or where the out of copyright status has only been ascertained for a specific jurisdiction. These rights statements should only be used when it is not possible to
use the Public Domain Mark or the CC0 Public Domain Dedication.

NO COPYRIGHT - CONTRACTUAL RESTRICTIONS
This Rights Statement can only be used for Items that are in the Public Domain but for which the data provider has entered into contractual agreement that requires it to take steps to restrict third party uses of the Item. In order for this Rights Statement to be conclusive, the data provider must provide a link to a page detailing the contractual restrictions that apply to the use of the Item.

NO COPYRIGHT - NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY
This Rights Statement can only be used for Works that are in the Public Domain and have been digitized in a public-private partnership as part of which, the partners have agreed to limit commercial uses of this digital representation of the Work by
third parties. It has been developed specifically to allow the inclusion of Works that have been digitized as part of the partnerships between European Libraries and Google, but can in theory be applied to Works that have been digitized in similar
public-private partnerships.

NO COPYRIGHT - OTHER KNOWN LEGAL RESTRICTIONS
This Rights Statement should be used for Items that are in the public domain but that cannot be freely re-used as the consequence of known legal restrictions that prevent the data provider from allowing free re-use of the Work, such as cultural heritage or traditional cultural expression protections. In order for this Rights Statement to be conclusive, the data provider must provide a link to a page detailing the legal restrictions that limit re-use of the Item.

NO COPYRIGHT - UNITED STATES
This Rights Statement should be used for Items for which the provider has determined are free of copyright under the laws of the United States. This Rights Statement should not be used for Orphan Works (which are assumed to be in copyright) or for Works where the data provider has not undertaken an effort to
ascertain the copyright status of the Work.

Other rights statements
The following two rights statements are intended for use with digital objects where the copyright status has not been determined with certainty. These should only be used if it is not possible to use a clearer rights statement or license.

COPYRIGHT NOT EVALUATED
This Rights Statement should be used for Items for which the copyright status is unknown and for which the organization that intends to make the Item available has not undertaken an effort to determine the copyright status of the underlying Work.

COPYRIGHT UNDETERMINED
This Rights Statement should be used for Items for which the copyright status is unknown and for which the organization that has made the Item available has undertaken an (unsuccessful) effort to determine the copyright status of the underlying Work. Typically, this Rights Statement is used when the organization is missing key facts essential to making an accurate copyright status determination.

NO KNOWN COPYRIGHT
This Rights Statement should be used for Items for which the copyright status has not been determined conclusively, but for which the organization that intends to make the Item available has reasonable cause to believe that the underlying Work is not covered by copyright or related rights anymore. This Rights Statement should not be used for Orphan Works (which are assumed to be in-copyright) or for Items where the organization that intends to make the Item available has not undertaken an effort to ascertain the copyright status of the underlying Work.

Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.

Our free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of
“all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.”

Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. They work alongside copyright and enable you to modify your copyright terms to best suit your needs.

Please use the URI in the Rights Management field. 

Attribution 
CC BY
This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials. 

Attribution-ShareAlike 
CC BY-SA 
This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects. 

Attribution-NoDerivs 
CC BY-ND 
This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you. 

Attribution-NonCommercial 
CC BY-NC 
This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms. 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
CC BY-NC-SA
This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 
CC BY-NC-ND
This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially. 

Public Domain Mark
We also provide tools that work in the “all rights granted” space of the public domain. Our CC0 tool allows licensors to waive all rights and place a work in the public domain, and our Public Domain Mark allows any web user to “mark” a work as being in the public domain. 
Refines/Refinement None
Schemes None
Dublin Core Mapping dcterms: rights
MARC Mapping none
Past Perfect Photos Copyrights
Past Perfect Archives Conditions of Access and Use
Past Perfect Objects N/A





    • Related Articles

    • MMP - Descriptive Metadata Best Practices

      INTRODUCTION The intent of the Descriptive Metadata Best Practices section of these guidelines is to provide direction for creating metadata records for digitized materials that have been reformatted from an existing physical resource, such as ...
    • MMP - Collection Policy

      Project Description The Montana Memory Project (MMP) is an online resource for digital collections relating to Montana's cultural heritage. These collections help to document the Montana experience. Access is free and open through the Internet. Many ...
    • MMP - Glossary of Terms

      Digital Imaging Vocabulary Bit Depth - Bit depth quantifies how many unique colors are available in an image’s color palette in terms of the number of 0’s and 1’s, or “bits.” See also: Dynamic Range Compression - The reduction of image file size for ...
    • MMP - Hardware and Software Recommendations

      Computer The hub of any scanning station is the computer. Because archival-quality digital files are very large in size and can be quite taxing on computers, ensure that your computer has adequate RAM and disk space. Remember that image-processing ...
    • MMP - File naming conventions for Collections

      Before you begin to scan and name files for your MMP collection(s), decide how you would like to name your files. This will ensure consistency, uniqueness in file names, and efficiency. It is important to know the scope and details of the collection, ...